10 of the Best Ways to Consider Consideration

123Greetings.com

As you go about your day, consider being thoughtful to someone else. You’d be surprised how easy it is to make a person feel special with one simple action or word from you. Being considerate of each other has become a thing of the past for many; however, there are many MORE people who are kind, selfless, and understanding of another human being.

The thing is that NOTHING is more appealing in this world than a simple touch or gesture from another person; one that lets us know that they care. Yeah, we may think becoming successful and having many things will be gratifying, but more importantly it is through our grace and kindness to one another that actually gives us the ability to become more powerful than ever before!

Think about how much you love and care for your pet, or even a car or some other inanimate object….THEN go be that kind to someone else in that manner.

To get you started, here are 10 of the best ways to consider consideration:

  1. Ask a family member or neighbor if they need anything while you’re out running errands.
  2. Take on someone else’s responsibility for a day; your spouse, a friend, a parent. They’ll be grateful for your service.
  3. Say “Please” and “Thank You” to those who do for you and say “Hi” to everyone!
  4. Chill out when it comes to a different point-of-view. Everyone has an opinion and you don’t have to agree with them. Think about how important the point is you’re trying to make. Is it really worth arguing about?
  5. Rub the shoulders of someone in pain, or extend a hand to a person in need.
  6. Kneel down and talk to a child; come down to their view of the world.
  7. Stop interrupting when someone else is talking. When in conversation, give the other person a chance to talk, too.
  8. Consider a person’s schedule, time, abilities, and even personality.
  9. Don’t leave other people out. For example, sit lower, place yourself properly, or keep your head still in a room full of people; like church, a concert, or other event…so as to not obstruct the view. Another example could be to include others in your invitations so as to not leave someone out.
  10. Remind yourself that every plastic bottle or box you recycle is probably two or three bags a week (in my house anyway) that you save from the landfill. That’s like helping billions of people all at once!

Some of these may be tough for many of readers, I’m sure. Good news is that being considerate is always as close as your nearest retailer. For instance, #8 comes in handy when in a checkout line. If the guy behind you has one item and your cart is a little hefty, let him go in front of you. Oh, and let’s not forget the cashier! Consider if she is busy; not to mention, dealing with the frustrations of those who wait their turn. Offer her a kind word and a stress-free transaction.

We all have things we can work on in ourselves. I can definitely name a few for me. The thing is to be conscious of what you are putting out there so that the best of you comes forward. Self-awareness is key when making changes to your behaviors. Make a note, list, or add a calendar entry with a recurring event, “Be considerate to someone today.” With time, you will automatically become a giver; of yourself and of your thoughtfulness.

When you intently put one consideration after another out there, you instantaneously become more graceful and happy. How about that for payoff!!!

Consider adding a comment here or on my post, “What’s the One Good Thing…”

I will end with a quote about consideration and character.

“Your greatness is measured by your kindness; your   education and intellect by your modesty; your ignorance is betrayed by your   suspicions and prejudices, and your real caliber is measured by the consideration and tolerance you have   for others.” – William   J. H. Boetcker

Thank you for visiting Loving with Purpose.

Kimberly Mitchell

To read more on dating, relationships, family and friends, check out my book, Loving with Purpose, or go to any of the following links…

Twitter  Facebook  Pinterest  MySpace  YouTube  Google+  Tumblr

Inner Child Healing

Boy & Sea

Boy & Sea

INNER CHILD HEALING

By Mary Cook, M.A., R.A.S.

Rigidity is a sign of aging, illness and death.  It can be hardening of the arteries or the prisons of addictions.  Our eyes can be glued to pornography, and miss the loving affection from our own child.  We might attempt to escape fear by imposing our will upon others.  We can be stuck in a whirlpool of unending desires or carry the carnage of resentments on our back.  Lives can be lost behind walls of isolation, or in busyness pridefully pretending to be productivity.  These are all ways of attaching ourselves to the edges of life, afraid to let go of our primal pain and its’ defenses.

In contrast, healthy children are focused on loving, learning, playing and evolving.  They are flexible, resilient and immersed in the natural flow of life.  They fully engage with the moment, which births the newness of the next moment.  Their play is devoid of judgment and self-consciousness.  It is children jumping up and down or babbling and squealing to the sound of music.  It’s free, spontaneous, relaxed, joyful, creative inner expression.  The feelings that accompany this kind of playfulness are often missing in adults.

A stressful or traumatic childhood leaves our inner child self frightened and stuck in dark places.  Lack of healthy bonding removes the lightness of life, in exchange for the stagnancy and emptiness of obsessions and compulsions.  As adults attempting to heal our inner child, we can visualize and surround this child with compassionate love and understanding.  We can know the child’s pain without becoming, denying, judging, resisting or fighting it.  We can show them that we will not drown in their torrent of tears, nor abandon them in response to their rejection, confusion, fear and emptiness.  Nor will we become defensive, offensive or die from their feelings of rage.  This patient, consistent acceptance and deeper awareness ultimately frees the inner child from pain and defenses.  Inner child bonding and healing creates a new sense of safety which stimulates flexibility, resilience and growth for our adult self, bringing a sense of hope, lightness and vitality that softens suffering, promotes happiness and puts us in the fullness of life.

Wounded Warriors

Sunset

Wounded Warriors

By Mary Cook, M.A., R.A.S.

SunsetAddicts enter recovery as wounded warriors with unhealed traumas and deprivations, and swords and shields that they hope will protect them from further suffering.  But the war is inside; between the defenses and dysfunction in the mind, and the heart pleading for mercy and grace, between the poisons in the body, and the spirit longing for peace and joy.

And the fear of letting go of all that we identify as ourselves and our lives is terrifying.  And the fear of facing all the wounds that we sustained and perpetrated, is overwhelming.  And the depth of the unknown truth, and absolute mystery of the next moment is incomprehensible.  And the experience of being helpless, exposed and vulnerable stimulates all past trauma and pain.

Yet recovery offers a warm welcome into a fellowship where we are safe and surrounded by a state of grace, much greater that the war and fear within us.  Everyone has value here and everyone has something to give.  We learn that hope arises from helping others and peace arises from practicing patience.  Healing is offered in exchange for swords.  Courage is offered in exchange for shields.  The pain of our defects and destructiveness now motivates us to serve the greater good in life.

We see how we are not separate from life but interwoven into the whole fabric of life.  Each moment holds magnificent possibilities of learning, of letting go, of growing, and of being.  We begin to feel our connection to the Source of pure goodness and mercy, and align our mind, heart, body and spirit to this truth.  The greater vision is not war, but compassionate cooperation.  The greater vision is not fear, but faith that we all can generously and joyfully contribute to the highest good for all of life.